Folks Dressed Up Like Eskimos

Everybody knows a turkey and some mistletoe helps to make the season bright, but not many people know how Eskimos dress.

Eskimos (in Canada, at least) generally prefer to be referred to as Inuit, which means "people" in Inuktitut, the language of the Inuit. Inuit have a variety of modes of dress.

This website shows you the diversity of Inuit style, so you can visualize it better, when you hear the song during this Christmas season.

Let's challenge the stereotypes! Email me your pictures at folksdresseduplikeeskimos@gmail.com

Nakurmiik!!

Joseph Flowers, Inuk from Nunatsiavut and Nunavik
This is my Mom. Here, she is picking out a fish to send to me. In Nunavik, Inuit go and hunt and fish and bring the meat and fish to a community freezer so that other Inuit who do not have the means to hunt or fish can have access to country food. You can learn more about the Inuit Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping Support Program at this webpage: CLICK
I love my constitutionally protected Aboriginal and Treaty rights (Thank you, s 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982!!!) because it means when Mom comes to visit me in the south and she brings me fish or meat or berries, I get to enjoy country food as my family back home does, and as my ancestors have done for thousands of years. 
Mom describes her outfit as follows:
"I am wearing a black Winter coat my mother bought for herself when she was in Labrador. It wasn’t comfortable on her so she gave it to me. I like it. She bought it from Reitman’s. I am wearing what I call my little bumble-bee gloves, not much good in very cold weather but sufficiently warm to pick out frozen fish. I am also wearing a checkered blue and black hooded flannel shirt that I bought at the Northern Store in Kuujjuaq. Oh yes and my best wardrobe feature, my big ol’ smile."

This is my Mom. Here, she is picking out a fish to send to me. In Nunavik, Inuit go and hunt and fish and bring the meat and fish to a community freezer so that other Inuit who do not have the means to hunt or fish can have access to country food. You can learn more about the Inuit Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping Support Program at this webpage: CLICK

I love my constitutionally protected Aboriginal and Treaty rights (Thank you, s 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982!!!) because it means when Mom comes to visit me in the south and she brings me fish or meat or berries, I get to enjoy country food as my family back home does, and as my ancestors have done for thousands of years. 

Mom describes her outfit as follows:

"I am wearing a black Winter coat my mother bought for herself when she was in Labrador. It wasn’t comfortable on her so she gave it to me. I like it. She bought it from Reitman’s. I am wearing what I call my little bumble-bee gloves, not much good in very cold weather but sufficiently warm to pick out frozen fish. I am also wearing a checkered blue and black hooded flannel shirt that I bought at the Northern Store in Kuujjuaq. Oh yes and my best wardrobe feature, my big ol’ smile."

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