Folks Dressed Up Like Eskimos

Everybody knows a turkey and some mistletoe helps to make the season bright, but not many people know how Eskimos dress.

Eskimos (in Canada, at least) generally prefer to be referred to as Inuit, which means "people" in Inuktitut, the language of the Inuit. Inuit have a variety of modes of dress.

This website shows you the diversity of Inuit style, so you can visualize it better, when you hear the song during this Christmas season.

Let's challenge the stereotypes! Email me your pictures at folksdresseduplikeeskimos@gmail.com

Nakurmiik!!

Joseph Flowers, Inuk from Nunatsiavut and Nunavik
This is my Mom. Here, she is picking out a fish to send to me. In Nunavik, Inuit go and hunt and fish and bring the meat and fish to a community freezer so that other Inuit who do not have the means to hunt or fish can have access to country food. You can learn more about the Inuit Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping Support Program at this webpage: CLICK
I love my constitutionally protected Aboriginal and Treaty rights (Thank you, s 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982!!!) because it means when Mom comes to visit me in the south and she brings me fish or meat or berries, I get to enjoy country food as my family back home does, and as my ancestors have done for thousands of years. 
Mom describes her outfit as follows:
"I am wearing a black Winter coat my mother bought for herself when she was in Labrador. It wasn’t comfortable on her so she gave it to me. I like it. She bought it from Reitman’s. I am wearing what I call my little bumble-bee gloves, not much good in very cold weather but sufficiently warm to pick out frozen fish. I am also wearing a checkered blue and black hooded flannel shirt that I bought at the Northern Store in Kuujjuaq. Oh yes and my best wardrobe feature, my big ol’ smile."

This is my Mom. Here, she is picking out a fish to send to me. In Nunavik, Inuit go and hunt and fish and bring the meat and fish to a community freezer so that other Inuit who do not have the means to hunt or fish can have access to country food. You can learn more about the Inuit Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping Support Program at this webpage: CLICK

I love my constitutionally protected Aboriginal and Treaty rights (Thank you, s 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982!!!) because it means when Mom comes to visit me in the south and she brings me fish or meat or berries, I get to enjoy country food as my family back home does, and as my ancestors have done for thousands of years. 

Mom describes her outfit as follows:

"I am wearing a black Winter coat my mother bought for herself when she was in Labrador. It wasn’t comfortable on her so she gave it to me. I like it. She bought it from Reitman’s. I am wearing what I call my little bumble-bee gloves, not much good in very cold weather but sufficiently warm to pick out frozen fish. I am also wearing a checkered blue and black hooded flannel shirt that I bought at the Northern Store in Kuujjuaq. Oh yes and my best wardrobe feature, my big ol’ smile."

This is my friend James. He is an Inuk from the Western Arctic and lives in the south. Maybe his house is cold, because he is wearing a warm coat inside. He didn’t give me too many details on the photo or on the clothes, but one thing is for sure: HE IS FOLKS DRESSED UP LIKE ESKIMOS.

This is my friend James. He is an Inuk from the Western Arctic and lives in the south. Maybe his house is cold, because he is wearing a warm coat inside. He didn’t give me too many details on the photo or on the clothes, but one thing is for sure: HE IS FOLKS DRESSED UP LIKE ESKIMOS.

My cousin Stephanie, whom you may recognize from last year’s batch of Eskimo styles, tells me: “This photo is of my sister, Blake’s, graduation.  I’m on the left, about 6 weeks out of a total hip replacement and proud I can stand there unassisted!  I’m wearing a dress from Joe (the store, not you, my dear cousin) and a necklace from Ten Thousand Villages.  On the right is Blake, rocking a hot pink dress from The Model Shop.”

My cousin Stephanie, whom you may recognize from last year’s batch of Eskimo styles, tells me: “This photo is of my sister, Blake’s, graduation.  I’m on the left, about 6 weeks out of a total hip replacement and proud I can stand there unassisted!  I’m wearing a dress from Joe (the store, not you, my dear cousin) and a necklace from Ten Thousand Villages.  On the right is Blake, rocking a hot pink dress from The Model Shop.”

Here’s a photo of my friend Kitty. She describes her clothing as follows: I am wearing a leather jacket I picked up at a garage sale for $5 and clothes mixed and matched from various womens department stores in Montreal. This outfit probably cost altogether $45-$50. This look is kind of the-everyday-me.

Here’s a photo of my friend Kitty. She describes her clothing as follows: I am wearing a leather jacket I picked up at a garage sale for $5 and clothes mixed and matched from various womens department stores in Montreal. This outfit probably cost altogether $45-$50. This look is kind of the-everyday-me.

This is a photo of my Uncle Danny. He says he is wearing seal skin pants and coat. Doesn’t look like it to me, but hey, he’s the one who is wearing the skins. Kuujjuaq, Nunavik. In front of his 2006 black and 2008 Harleys. 
Uncle Danny wrote me a note, saying: “HI Joey, I was only joking when I said I’m wearing a seal skin pants and jacket I thought you would have noticed they were not seal skin clothing they are regular black jeans and a black Harley jacket. Sorry for the false info but just letting you know the TRUTH!!!”

This is a photo of my Uncle Danny. He says he is wearing seal skin pants and coat. Doesn’t look like it to me, but hey, he’s the one who is wearing the skins. Kuujjuaq, Nunavik. In front of his 2006 black and 2008 Harleys. 

Uncle Danny wrote me a note, saying: “HI Joey, I was only joking when I said I’m wearing a seal skin pants and jacket I thought you would have noticed they were not seal skin clothing they are regular black jeans and a black Harley jacket. Sorry for the false info but just letting you know the TRUTH!!!”

Here’s a photo of my cousin Denise and her man Ches. They are wearing traditional Labrador Silapaks (the Labrador word is “dickie”) made of canvas with wolf fur around the hood. We are also wearing Chimo hats, mine as you can see has ears, while Ches’ hat, made in Pangnirtung, does not.

My cousin Tanya is an excellent artist, who painted the coke bottle you see in the photo. It was featured in the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Here, Tanya is wearing, in her words, “beautiful custom made kamiks by Jennifer Watkins, purple dress I ordered from forever 21 and a beautiful see-through top inspired by the traditional amautik with fox fur trim made by Winnie Grey.”

My cousin Tanya is an excellent artist, who painted the coke bottle you see in the photo. It was featured in the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Here, Tanya is wearing, in her words, “beautiful custom made kamiks by Jennifer Watkins, purple dress I ordered from forever 21 and a beautiful see-through top inspired by the traditional amautik with fox fur trim made by Winnie Grey.”

This is a picture of my friend Jeannie. All she is wearing is what she calls “an Eskimo hat!” An excellent outfit for walking in a winter wonderland, don’t you think? 

This is a picture of my friend Jeannie. All she is wearing is what she calls “an Eskimo hat!” An excellent outfit for walking in a winter wonderland, don’t you think? 

This is my sister, who exists. So I call her my sister-exister. She says, “I am wearing a fur hat, a North Face/Gortex winter jacket, and a pair of Lululemon pants. On my feet, I was wearing a pair of basic black winter boots and Diana brand pink nail polish.”

This is my sister, who exists. So I call her my sister-exister. She says, “I am wearing a fur hat, a North Face/Gortex winter jacket, and a pair of Lululemon pants. On my feet, I was wearing a pair of basic black winter boots and Diana brand pink nail polish.”

This is my Uncle Sandy. I was originally only going to post this photo on Friday, but I decided to post this photo now instead.
He is wearing his Krapp Dinner t-shirt and a Pirate’s hat. Our family is very grateful to have Uncle Sandy. He once had a terrible motorcycle accident which left him in a coma for weeks. Our family was not sure if he was going to live, but he came out of it. Love to you, Uncle! 

This is my Uncle Sandy. I was originally only going to post this photo on Friday, but I decided to post this photo now instead.

He is wearing his Krapp Dinner t-shirt and a Pirate’s hat. Our family is very grateful to have Uncle Sandy. He once had a terrible motorcycle accident which left him in a coma for weeks. Our family was not sure if he was going to live, but he came out of it. Love to you, Uncle!